'The Hate U Give': Another Resource in the Youth Organizing Toolkit - Advancement Project - Advancement Project

‘The Hate U Give’: Another Resource in the Youth Organizing Toolkit

In this heightened moment of political activity, young people are in need of an outlet to voice their concerns and feel empowered to impact what’s going on around them. The film, “The Hate U Give” makes an important point about what many young people of color experience, what they are witnessing and how to be politically engaged by it. While the film doesn’t go in depth about the intricacies of student organizing, Advancement Project’s national office linked the movie to real-life, on-the-ground organizing by hosting free screenings followed by panel discussions in Washington, DC, St. Louis, Detroit, Miami and Chicago.

“The Hate U Give” is an adaptation of the novel by Angie Thomas, and tells the story of Starr, a Black teenage girl from California who witnesses her childhood friend get murdered by the police. The film also tackles various issues that communities of color are often faced with, including gang violence, quality education, mass incarceration and police brutality.

Seeing “The Hate U Give” as an opportunity to engage with young people surrounding youth organizing and policing, Advancement Project national office, with support from the Black Executives’ Alliance for Boys and Men of Color, hosted free screenings for our partners including Ferguson Collaborative, ArchCity Defenders, ActionSTL, Nation Outside, BYP100, Dream Defenders, Assata’s Daughters, and Brighton Park Neighborhood Council. Each organization participated on a panel to unpack the various themes in the film and discuss efforts on the ground in their respective communities and mobilizing efforts involving young people and the community at large. Advancement Project national office offered our perspective on student organizing by highlighting our school policing report, “We Came to Learn,” which details some of the history, impact and success of student organizing.

 

KEEP READING

Leading Civil Rights and Racial Justice Organizations Support and Applaud the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s National Day of Racial Healing, January 21, 2020

New York, NY—With daily race motivated hate crimes happening globally, pausing to participate in a National Day of Racial Healing (#NDORH) is vitally important. On Tuesday, January 21, 2020, many organizations, individuals, and communities will be taking collective action during the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s fourth annual National Day of Racial Healing to celebrate our racial diversity and reinforce and honor our common humanity. Among these organizations are the Racial Equity Anchor Institutions (“The Anchors”) supported by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The Anchors will be creating space to explore our common humanity and build the relationships necessary to create a more…

Read More
Reps. Elijah Cummings and John Conyers, Jr. got us this far. Now it’s on us to advance the fight.

By Judith Browne Dianis In the span of 10 days, we lost Congressman Elijah Cummings and retired Congressman John Conyers Jr. Both men dedicated their lives to fighting to make our union a little more perfect than it was when they found it. Losing our elders is never easy. Each passing prompts reflections on the good fights they fought and the lives they led. There’s a comfort in standing on the shoulders of living giants that get ripped away when those giants make their transition from the earth. If we take nothing else from the lives…

Read More
Five Years after the Killing of Mike Brown, the Ferguson Uprising, a New Report Highlights a Group of Ferguson, MO, Activists Successfully Working Since 2014 to Change Policing Practices and Rise to Positions of Authority

FERGUSON, MO – As the nation marks five years since the police killing of teenager Mike Brown and the series of protests known as the Ferguson Uprising, a report released today by Advancement Project National Office points to how a hyperlocal group of Ferguson activists have been changing the City’s unconstitutional policing and criminal legal system practices. This group of residents and allies, now known as the Ferguson Collaborative, have spent the past five years putting the pressure on local and federal policymakers and courts, ousting a court-appointed official, rallying for the dismissal of thousands of municipal court cases and…

Read More
Advancement Project Turns 20

  6–10 p.m. EST* THIS IS NOT A GALA—It’s a movement! We put together the racial justice event of the year! Advancement Project National Office celebrated 20 years of progressive racial justice movement work with an event beyond any gala. Hundreds came out and joined our attorneys, organizers, grassroots partners and influencers in racial justice sports, culture, arts, and entertainment as we celebrated with great food, performances, and more. This was for the people! If you missed it, or just want to relive the night’s moments, check out the gallery below. *By taking part in this event you grant the event organizers full…

Read More
What is a Strong Movement Without Art?

Art has long been essential to building strong movements. As such, Advancement Project National Office is excited to announce that we’ve partnered with GoArtful to create a capsule collection for our 20th anniversary!

Read More
We’re fighting a racist, predatory system; and we’re winning: a look at the numbers

Did you know St. Louis jails Black people eight times more than white people in a city that is only 47 percent Black?

Read More
U.S. Supreme Court Strikes Dangerous and Untested Citizenship Question from the 2020 Census – For Now

Today, the Supreme Court issued a ruling in Department of Commerce v. New York, rejecting the Trump Administration’s attempt to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Decennial Census.

Read More
Celebrating Black Women’s Resistance on Juneteenth

On the 154th anniversary of Juneteenth, a subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives will hold the first hearing on the topic of reparations for slavery since 2007. The hearing, which is the second in history, will focus in part on H.R. 40. H.R. 40, a piece of legislation that would employ a commission to study the legacy of slavery and consider reparations proposals.[1] While the fight for reparations gained prominence in recent years, the issue has been waged for centuries, championed by Black women.[2] However, media surrounding the upcoming hearing largely erases this history…

Read More
Federal Judge: Cash Bail in St. Louis is Unconstitutional

The ruling of a federal judge in St. Louis confirms that the City has violated the rights of hundreds of people, who have been detained before trial at one of the City’s two jails--the Justice Center and the Medium Security Institution, also known as the Workhouse--solely because they are unable to pay money bail.

Read More