'The Hate U Give': Another Resource in the Youth Organizing Toolkit - Advancement Project - Advancement Project

‘The Hate U Give’: Another Resource in the Youth Organizing Toolkit

In this heightened moment of political activity, young people are in need of an outlet to voice their concerns and feel empowered to impact what’s going on around them. The film, “The Hate U Give” makes an important point about what many young people of color experience, what they are witnessing and how to be politically engaged by it. While the film doesn’t go in depth about the intricacies of student organizing, Advancement Project’s national office linked the movie to real-life, on-the-ground organizing by hosting free screenings followed by panel discussions in Washington, DC, St. Louis, Detroit, Miami and Chicago.

“The Hate U Give” is an adaptation of the novel by Angie Thomas, and tells the story of Starr, a Black teenage girl from California who witnesses her childhood friend get murdered by the police. The film also tackles various issues that communities of color are often faced with, including gang violence, quality education, mass incarceration and police brutality.

Seeing “The Hate U Give” as an opportunity to engage with young people surrounding youth organizing and policing, Advancement Project national office, with support from the Black Executives’ Alliance for Boys and Men of Color, hosted free screenings for our partners including Ferguson Collaborative, ArchCity Defenders, ActionSTL, Nation Outside, BYP100, Dream Defenders, Assata’s Daughters, and Brighton Park Neighborhood Council. Each organization participated on a panel to unpack the various themes in the film and discuss efforts on the ground in their respective communities and mobilizing efforts involving young people and the community at large. Advancement Project national office offered our perspective on student organizing by highlighting our school policing report, “We Came to Learn,” which details some of the history, impact and success of student organizing.

 

KEEP READING

National #PoliceFreeSchools Advocates Welcome “Counseling Not Criminalization” Legislation

Bicameral bill would shift federal resources away from school police and incentivize investment in evidence-based supports for students 

Read More
Advancement Project National Office Applauds Senate Confirmation of Kristen Clarke as Assistant Attorney General for the Department of Justice

Clarke Becomes First Woman of color to lead the Department’s Civil Rights Division

Read More
Advancement Project Calls on America to Move Beyond Police and Prisons: “We Can’t Reform This System”

A year after George Floyd’s murder, Advancement Project National Office reflects on how to build a #FreeandSafe society for all people of color.

Read More
The Best Mother’s Day Gift is Freedom

By Ashley Carter, Justice Project Program Deputy Director and Senior Staff Attorney Photo credit: Cyndi Elledge // Photos are a part of the #FreeBlackWomxn series. Visit www.freeblackwomxn.org. Thousands of women with children across the United States will spend this Mother’s Day behind bars. The crisis of mass incarceration has fueled a family separation endemic: more than 150,000 children have a parent who is in jail simply because they are too poor to afford their court-imposed cash bail. This year we are working to support the 2021 Black Mama’s Day Bailout organized and led by our community partners…

Read More
Black Mama Bailout: #FreeBlackWomxn

Michigan Liberation and the Advancement Project National Office have launched the #FreeBlackWomxn campaign, a photo and storytelling project that elevates the voices of Black Michigan mothers who have experienced incarceration. We are honored that Kimberly, Machelle, Geneva, Darnita, Dominica, Irene, and Tamika shared their stories with us. Click each woman’s photo below to read their experience with incarceration.

Read More
Photo of the back of a police officer
More Cop Convictions Won’t Stop Racist Police Violence

By Thomas B. Harvey, Justice Project Program Director Last week, as people across America waited for a verdict in Derek Chauvin’s trial, police in Ohio murdered a 16-year-old girl, Ma’Khia Bryant. As Chauvin was found guilty on three counts for murdering George Floyd in Minneapolis, Ma’Khia Bryant lay dead in the street in Columbus. Credit: Fred Moon While we should hope that Chauvin’s conviction brings some peace and healing to George Floyd’s family, friends, and the broader Minneapolis community, Ma’Khia’s murder reinforced a disturbing reality: individual convictions are irrelevant to the movement to end police violence. Cops will continue to…

Read More
Civil Rights and Racial Justice Organizations Applaud Chauvin Verdict: Accountability in the Courtroom One Step in Journey to Justice

This verdict, while unexpected in light of far too many past cases like this, does not bring George Floyd back.

Read More
Advancement Project Welcomes Chauvin Verdict, Implores America to Move Beyond Policing

Today, in response to the conviction of Derek Chauvin for second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter...

Read More
Advancement Project Statement on Murder of Adam Toledo

Today, we join Chicago in grief and outrage at the murder of Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old Latino boy whose life was cruelly taken by Chicago Police. We express our deepest sympathy to Adam’s friends and family; we stand in solidarity with organizers, activists, and the broader Chicago community as they take to the street to express their despair and demand justice.

Read More